Chairing a meeting – The Language Professional

Chairing a meeting

ENGLISH FOR WORK - EXTRA

Prepare

tangible - adj. /ˈtændʒəbəl/ something that is tangible can be seen, touched or measured. Yes, your idea sounds promising, but what are the tangible benefits?
commodity - n.[c.] /kəˈmɒdəti/ a product that you can buy or sell
agenda - n.[c.] /əˈdʒendə/ a list of the things that will be discussed at a meeting

Read this article by Forbes called '5 Ways to Lead a Meeting' and think about your own experiences of the meetings you've been involved in:

  • Is there always a tangible reason for holding the meeting?
  • Is there a clear agenda? And if so, does the meeting always keep to the agenda?
  • What are participants expected to do? Are these expectations clear to everyone?
  • Is there an opportunity for participants to give feedback and recommendations?

​Finally, one last question to consider:

  • Do you agree with the writer that "the best leaders can make at least 30 solid decisions in 30 minutes throughout the course of a meeting​​"?

​We'll start our lesson by ​discussing your thoughts.

Learn

You'll need to book a lesson.

Review

You’ll receive an activity sheet after the lesson to help review and summarize the lesson. [To type on PDFs: 1) download Adobe Acrobat Reader DC (free), 2) Tools -> Fill & Sign]

​Check your answers

​PRO TIP
​To type answers on PDFs: 1) download Adobe Acrobat Reader DC (free), 2) Tools > Fill & Sign

​Follow-up

​​Practise being the minute taker yourself ​while you watch a meeting.

You’ll need to listen carefully and take brief notes of the main points in the meeting. The meeting has 3 participants, from the left: Amy, Beth and Carla.

  1. Get a pen and piece of paper ready for your minute taking.
  2. Watch the video and make notes on the main points and any agreed actions.
  3. Compare your minutes ​to my minutes. Are they similar? Did you catch all the important details?
  4. Watch the video again. Can you catch anything new?
head (a project) up - v. /'hed ʌp/ to lead a project, department or organisation
​touch base (with someone) - v. /tʌtʃ 'beɪs/ to talk with someone (often to catch up, discuss an idea or give an update)
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